Posted by on May 19, 2017 at 10:13 am

Roger Barlow is a Research Professor and Institute Director in the University of Huddersfield’s International Institute for Accelerator Applications (IIAA).  In this blog he talks about the opening of the SESAME accelerator in the Middle East and how to hear of a co-operative project between scientists of nations, whose governments are so hostile to one

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Posted in Chemistry physics Science Tagged in: , , , , ,


Posted by on March 6, 2017 at 1:28 pm

Professor Roger Barlow is a Research Professor and Director of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the University of Huddersfield.   Here, he talks about the CMS collaboration which has upgraded their central tracker and explains why they are spending so much time and money on improving equipmenn which has, in the past, worked so well.

Posted in Chemistry physics Research Science Tagged in: , , , , , ,


Posted by on February 23, 2017 at 10:07 am

Roger Barlow is a Research Professor and Director of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the University of Huddersfield.  Here, in an article written for The Conversation he answers the question ‘if atoms are mostly empty space why do objects look and feel solid?’.

Posted in Chemistry physics Science The Conversation Tagged in: , , , , , ,


Posted by on December 9, 2016 at 12:47 pm

Professor Roger Barlow is a Research Professor and Director of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the University of Huddersfield.  Here, he talks about how Brexit is the latest problem for the UK’s fusion laboratory at Culham and how it now faces an uncertain future.

Posted in Chemistry physics Politics Science Tagged in: , ,


Posted by on December 2, 2015 at 10:30 am

Professor Roger Barlow is a Research Professor and Director of the International Institute for Accelerator Applications.  Here, in an article published on The Conversation and as part of their Explainer: series, he explains why the billions and billions of stars that fill our universe don’t make the night sky a blaze of light.

Posted in History Mathematics physics Science The Conversation Tagged in: , , , , , ,