Posted by on February 3, 2015 at 1:08 pm

Between 23 and 26 July I attended the International Standing Conference in the History of Education at the Institute of Education in London. I found it really useful – and enjoyed it – it for a number of reasons. First, it gave me the chance to work on the new archival material I gathered in

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Posted by on December 14, 2014 at 8:12 am

On 13 December 2014, about thirty students taking the first year module ‘Twentieth Century Britain’ visited Heritage Quay, the University of Huddersfield’s brand new archives centre. The visit was an integral part of the module, taught by Paul Ward and Liz Pente, to look at a scrapbook of primary source materials from the J.H. Whitley

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Posted by on November 30, 2014 at 8:16 pm

Despite the scriptural warrant for their existence, early Protestant reformers were ambivalent about the visual representation of angels in places of worship, due to a fear of falling into the sin of idolatry. By the seventeenth century, however, a move to express the ‘beauty of holiness’ began to soften attitudes towards such images, and angels

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Posted by on November 24, 2014 at 2:14 pm

As part of his second year work placement, History and Film student Tomi Zelei made a film about the relationship between the University of Huddersfield and the community in which it is located. Tomi’s film explores the links between the town and also the idea of a university community. History at Huddersfield uses research-led teaching

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Posted by on November 9, 2014 at 8:24 am

My name is Adam West currently in my final year studying history at the University of Huddersfield. Along with 4 other fellow students and post-graduates I took part assisting at The Hepworth Wakefield’s heritage weekend, which was part of the national Heritage Open Days programme. Over the weekend of the 13th and 14th September 2014

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Posted by on November 1, 2014 at 8:05 am

Paul Ward, Professor of Modern British History, and Milton Brown, founder of Kirklees Local TV and Kirklees African Descent Community Media Productions, gave a joint paper at a workshop at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies in London on what’s happening in black British history. We argued that the future of black British history lies in

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Posted by on October 8, 2014 at 10:57 am

Our Day started at 4 am on Monday 30th June -luckily the day was bright enough to almost wake us up and following a relaxed, caffeine fuelled, train journey we arrived ata a frantic, peak commuter-time, Kings Cross Station. In route to Queen Mary University’s East End campus, where we were to learn all about

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Posted by on September 25, 2014 at 12:12 pm

Maggie Bullett, PhD student, tells us about an exciting project in which third year history and computer games design students are working together to create a digital reconstruction of a four hundred year old chapel. When Sir Arthur Ingram rebuilt Temple Newsam House in the 1630s, he included an internal chapel so that his family

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Posted by on September 20, 2014 at 8:53 am

Paul Ward, Professor of Modern British History and author of Britishness since 1870 (London, 2004), considers the role of history in understanding the outcome of the referendum on Scottish independence in September 2014. I’m terribly disappointed by the outcome of the Scottish referendum. I hoped for Scottish independence as a way of changing a too

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Posted by on July 23, 2014 at 10:07 am

On June 28th I was given the opportunity to work with the UKPHA’s outreach team at the BBC’s World War One at home tour in Woolwich. The BBC’s World War one at Home tour is visiting many different locations in the UK and the aim of tour is too reflect on the impact the war

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