Posted by on July 18, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Lyn Tett and Gwyneth Allatt, HudCRES. Gwyneth and Lyn have recently published a paper: Allatt, G. and Tett, L. (2018) Adult literacy practitioners and employability skills: resisting neoliberalism? Journal of Education Policy, DOI:10.1080/02680939.2018.1493144.   Our research in the Scottish central belt and the north of England shows how government policies, especially those relating to

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Posted in Informal Education Lifelong Learning Tagged in: ,


Posted by on July 11, 2018 at 1:50 pm

Alison Stott, Research Development Manager, HudCRES.   The eagle-eyed amongst you will perhaps have noticed that there wasn’t the usual Wednesday afternoon blog post last week. There’s a good reason for this – last Wednesday, everyone at HudCRES was a little too busy hosting, or taking part in: HudCRES … in conversation     Seventy-five people from

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Posted in Events Research Impact Tagged in:


Posted by on June 20, 2018 at 1:50 pm

Roy Halpin, HudCRES. Okay, I’ll admit it, my post has an intentionally provocative title! The answer is ‘yes’. Or ‘no’. ‘Possibly’? As ever, it depends on who you ask.   During my teaching career – in Sixth Form, Further Education (FE) and Initial Teacher Education (ITE) environments – the working landscape has been transformed from

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Posted in Initial Teacher Education Lifelong Learning Post-Compulsory Education (PCET) Technology Tagged in:


Posted by on June 13, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Charlotte Oliver, Cy-Gen Postgraduate Researcher, HudCRES.   The recent Bank Holiday weekend was a very exciting one for me. Not because I was sunning myself in the local beer garden or finally completing that bit of DIY around the house but because (following on from Prof Robin Simmons’blog post last week) I had the

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Posted in Events Researcher Development Tagged in:


Posted by on June 6, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Professor Robin Simmons, HudCRES. Summer is approaching, which means that it’s conference season!   Academics (including many of my HudCRES colleagues) will be travelling across Britain and overseas to present their work and learn about the latest developments in their field – and, in many ways, this is a great thing.   On one

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Posted in Being a researcher Events Tagged in:


Posted by on May 30, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Cheryl Reynolds, HudCRES. I have recently been reading a LOT of papers on the sociology of education that use the work of Pierre Bourdieu. Many show great insight and employ his ideas as they were meant to be employed – as intellectually challenging tools with which to think about the complex and nuanced social

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Posted in Social Justice Society Tagged in:


Posted by on May 23, 2018 at 1:50 pm

Alison Stott, Research Development Manager, HudCRES.   This Friday, the 25th of May, is GDPR day!   At the end of this week, new legislation which governs the processing, holding or use of ‘personal data’ and will come into force across the EU in the form of the General Data Protection Regulation and, in the

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Posted in Events Tagged in:


Posted by on May 16, 2018 at 1:50 pm

Andrew Walsh, National Teaching Fellow and Academic Librarian   As part of my research into play and learning in adults, I’ve been considering the problem of ‘permission to play’. Young children (and animals) play without prompting, and it can be seen as the primary way in which they learn social and survival skills. Play allows

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Posted in Post-Compulsory Education (PCET) Tagged in:


Posted by on May 9, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Alison Ryan, HudCRES. One of the key research questions for my doctorate, looking at informal learning in medieval re-enactment, is the role of apprenticeships.   The skills that are learnt by modern re-enactors through their informal learning are, in most cases, those that would have been taught in medieval times through an apprenticeship.    

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Posted in Informal Education Tagged in:


Posted by on May 2, 2018 at 1:50 pm

  Rachel Terry, and Dr Kate Lavender, HudCRES. Finding time to write is one of the key challenges of balancing academic study with everything else (work, home, family…). Whilst thinking, reading and talking about research may fit into the small chunks of time available on the journey to work or over coffee, writing appears to

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Posted in Being a researcher Writing Tagged in: ,